Shang-Chi’s greatest student will never join the MCU 2024

The Marvel Cinematic Universe is well-known for staying true to the original material while also introducing new heroes and villains. One of them is Shang-Chi, who had a significantly more modest beginning in comic books. In fact, one Marvel comic linked him to Hasbro’s toy line of authentic American heroes.

G.I. Joe comic books were formerly produced by Marvel Comics, with an issue printed in the United Kingdom starring Shang-Chi in a major role. This journey, which included training G.I. Joe member Quick Kick, cemented Shang-Chi’s status as Marvel’s best martial artist.

Unfortunately, Shang-Chi’s recent movie success will not be enough to bring this aspect to the big screen, especially because the cinematic rights to the G.I. Joe series are controlled by a corporation other than Marvel Studios.

Shang-Chi's greatest student will never join the MCU.

Shang Chi once trained a member of G.I. Joe.

Quick Kick first appeared in the G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero line in 1985, as one of several martial artists on the G.I. Joe squad. He earned the rank of Corporal E-4 and specialized in quiet weapons and hand-to-hand combat. Quick Kick, born MacArthur S. Ito, was shunned in his hometown of Watts because of his mixed Japanese-Korean ethnicity.

Nonetheless, he was able to carve out a place for himself in martial arts, and his abilities led him to Hollywood to work as a stuntman. This grabbed the attention of the military, and later, G.I. Joe. Strangely, Quick Kick seldom, if ever, communicated with Snake Eyes, a fellow swordsman and martial artist.

Quick Kick first appeared in the G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero line in 1985, as one of several martial artists on the G.I. Joe squad. He earned the rank of Corporal E-4 and specialised in quiet weapons and hand-to-hand combat.

Quick Kick, born MacArthur S. Ito, was shunned in his hometown of Watts because of his mixed Japanese-Korean ethnicity. Nonetheless, he was able to carve out a place for himself in martial arts, and his abilities led him to Hollywood to work as a stuntman.

This grabbed the attention of the military, and later, G.I. Joe. Strangely, Quick Kick seldom, if ever, communicated with Snake Eyes, a fellow swordsman and martial artist.

Marvel UK released the American Marvel G.I. Joe comic books under the name Action Force. A narrative in Action Force #17 (drawn by Steve Yeowell and written by none other than renowned writer Grant Morrison) detailed the origins of Quick Kick and who had instructed him in martial arts.

This was none other than resident Marvel Universe martial artist Shang-Chi, who is both known as such and seen wearing his famous Red Gi.

Quick Kick recalls fondly the teachings Shang-Chi taught him, as well as his master’s skills. In fact, he compares the guy to fellow martial artists like as Elektra, Batroc the Leaper, and Iron Fist, but the G.I. Joe member observes that Shang-Chi was much more adept.

Shang-Chi Was Completely Different in the MCU.

Shang-Chi debuted in the Marvel Cinematic Universe with the 2021 film Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings. This film changed a lot about the character, although some of that was required. After all, the martial arts teacher was originally presented as opposing his father, the wicked Dr. Fu Manchu.

That adversary was not invented by Marvel, but rather a licenced figure originally written about by Sax Rohmer. Of course, when Marvel lost the rights to Fu Manchu, all allusions to him in Shang-Chi’s past were removed.

The film avoided this by making his father the authentic version of The Mandarin. This antagonist, who has been transformed beyond recognition, was once Iron Man’s arch enemy in the comic books. Similarly, Shang-Chi’s tone was significantly less grounded or espionage-based than in his original adventures, and he was transformed into a magical figure akin to someone from an anime.

By the end of the film, he bore little similarity to the guy in the comic books who trained G.I. Joe’s Quick Kick. Of course, the G.I. Joe property is not owned by Marvel, thus it falls under the same category as the Fu Manchu novels.

Marvel Comics handled their previously licenced comics in the best way.

Marvel Comics isn’t the only publisher that has previously released comic books based on licenced concepts, but the firm did it in a unique way. For example, their version of 2001: A Space Odyssey introduced Machine Man into the mainstream Marvel Universe.

This theme was carried over into the 1970s and 1980s, with different toy tie-ins. The earliest of them were Rom and Micronauts, both of which were based on toys that Marvel Comics had no involvement with. Godzilla temporarily had his own comic book series, and Transformers and G.I. Joe were long-running successes for the publisher. In fact, both survived longer than their respective cartoons.

Unlike Marvel’s Star Wars and Planet of the Apes comics, these were seen as taking place in some form of the Marvel Universe. In reality, Rom notably engaged with the X-Men and Power Man and Iron Fist. Similarly, Nick Fury (also known as “Nicholas”) had a brief cameo in the Transformers comic book, as did the black symbiote-suit Spider-Man in an issue when he assisted the Autobots.

This provided the books a sense of “prestige,” demonstrating that they were more than just cheap tie-ins or cash grabs with the newest pop culture trends. Sadly, this history isn’t enough to reconcile Quick Kick with his Marvel Comics master.

G.I. Joe and Marvel are owned by different film studios.

Shang-Chi's greatest student will never join the MCU.

Despite the pattern set by earlier G.I. Joe comic book adventures, Shang-Chi’s encounters with Quick Kick are unlikely to be repeated in any media. When it comes to comic books, Marvel has not controlled the G.I. Joe licence for decades, and the property is currently owned by Skybound Entertainment.

These new comics from the Image Comics label are part of the “Energon Universe,” which means the Joes share the same world as Transformers, another Hasbro trademark. With no link to Marvel Comics, it’s difficult to envisage a scenario in which current Shang-Chi comic books might use Quick Kick. The same is very obviously true for live-action films.

The Marvel film Universe is created by Marvel Studios, although Sony owns the film rights to Spider-Man and his associated characters. Paramount, on the other hand, handles the G.I. Joe rights, as well as the TV and movie rights to Transformers and the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles franchise.

There has never been an intercompany MCU crossover, and it is unlikely to change very soon. Ironically, Paramount produced the first Iron Man film, which makes the absence of a Shang-Chi/Quick Kick cinematic meeting all the more heartbreaking. Even if such a crossover were possible, the chances of Shang-Chi and Quick Kick reconnecting are minimal to none.

Shang-Chi has so far played a minor role in the MCU, and while fans want him back, he has yet to appear in anything other than his standalone film. Similarly, the revamped and nebulous “Hasbro Movie Universe” has failed to properly reveal a new version of G.I. Joe after Transformers: Rise of the Beasts.

When the squad is completely established, stalwarts like Duke, Snake Eyes, and Scarlett will receive significantly more attention than Quick Kick. This implies that the finest martial artist to ever train the G.I. Joe member will be a distant memory, erasing Shang-Chi’s most significant accomplishment.

Source: CBR

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